Atheists in Kenya Continue to Fight w/ Harrison Mumia

Harrison Mumia is the President of Atheists In Kenya (AIK), the most vibrant atheists movement in Kenya.

Atheists In Kenya's mission is to promote the growth and interaction of atheists in Kenya. Harrison has debated at numerous forums in Kenya including the University of Nairobi debate, titled "Does God Exist?".

He has extensively written articles about atheism, religion and secularism both in Kenyan print and on the atheists in Kenya website, as well as google groups and blogs. He has been featured on the BBC, CNN as well as  NTV, KTN, Nation FM, QFM, Family Radio and KBC, which are all mainstream TV and Radio stations in Kenya, discussing issues revolving around secularism, atheism and religion in Kenya. 

Born in 1978, in Nairobi, Harrison Mumia completed his Bachelor of Science in Computer Science in 2003 at the Jomo Kenyatta University, Kenya. He is currently working with the Central Bank of Kenya as a Corporate Communications Manager. 

Through his experience as a leading atheist in Kenya, Mumia has worked together with local secular groups to push for a total separation of religion and state in Kenya. His articles have elicited public debate in the areas of religious education in public schools, preaching in public space especially in public transport vehicles and the authenticity of miracles by religious leaders. Inspired by atheists like Richard Dawkins, the late Christopher Hitchens, Mumia is committed to promoting secularism in Kenya.  

Today, more than 80 percent of the 46 million residents of Kenya are Christian. The remaining 20 percent of the country is a combination of Islam, Hinduism and traditionalists. And the word “atheist” is one rarely uttered by your average Kenyan.

In Kenya, religious indoctrination and adherence to the Abrahamic faiths is deeply engrained into the culture. Children pray in public schools and orphanages, prayer takes place in the workplace, and Christian beliefs and practices are preached on all of the major Kenyan media outlets on a daily basis. One visit to the country and experiencing the culture may leave the impression that there is no hope for secularism here.

This is where Harrison Mumia and the Atheists in Kenya group come in. Mumia is pioneering the unthinkable. He is taking on the overwhelming task of challenging the religious privilege by promoting secular and humanist values. Mumia and his team are openly secular and have appeared on many of the Kenyan media outlets, including the major newspaper and morning talk shows. They are working hard to bring many of the secular "firsts" to Kenya including the first ever atheist conference, atheist billboards, debates and much more. They are a shining beacon of hope for secular ideals in a country that is grossly indoctrinated into a religion that was forced upon their country.